News

Theologian and Historian Timothy Matovina Discusses Electoral Effect of Latino Vote

Author: Michael O. Garvey

According to University of Notre Dame theologian and historian Timothy Matovina, “bold proclamations about Latino voters determining presidential elections have become a regular feature of political commentary.” Matovina, professor of theology and director of Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, is the author of a recent history titled Latino Catholicism: Transformation in America’s Largest Church. “In fact,” he says, “the electoral significance of Latinos is growing steadily, but not as exponentially as such commentaries suggest.”

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Theologian Timothy Matovina's Book Explores the Challenge and Blessing of Latino Catholicism

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Statisticians quibble, but it is widely agreed that most Americans identify themselves as Christians, and it is inarguable that the Catholic Church is the largest of the Christian churches in the nation. More than half of the Catholics in the United States who are under the age of 25 are Latinos, and, due to birthrates and immigration, a majority of American Catholics will be Latinos by the year 2050. A new book by Notre Dame theologian Timothy Matovina closely considers the five-century-long history of Latino Catholics in America and how that history has affected them and their Church.

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Carlos Jáuregui Joins Notre Dame Spanish Faculty

Author: Mark Shuman

Distinguished scholar Carlos Jáuregui joined the University of Notre Dame faculty this fall as an associate professor of Spanish in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. A native of Bogotá, Colombia, Jáuregui is the author of several books whose scholarship encompasses colonial and transatlantic studies, cultural studies, 19th-century Latin American literature, postcolonial theory, and the cultural history of Spanish America and Brazil.

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Playwright and Theatre Scholar Gives Voice to Lost Stories

Author: Liquid error: internal

Intersecting cultures. Family heritage. Art. Love. Money. All these themes work their way onstage in Provenance, a new play by Anne García-Romero, a Moreau Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT).

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Paul Farmer and Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez to take part in campus dialogue

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Paul Gustavo and Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez, OP

When Paul Farmer came to campus in April to accept the Notre Dame Award for International Human Development and Solidarity on behalf of the global health organization he cofounded 25 years ago, he was profoundly moved by the opportunity to talk to a member of the Notre Dame community who has deeply inspired his mission to bring high-quality health care to the very poor.

Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez, O.P., the John Cardinal O’Hara Professor of Theology and a Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow, is known around the world as the founder of liberation theology.

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Anthropologist Agustín Fuentes Explains “Planet of the Apes” Fascination

Author: Liquid error: internal

Rise of the Planet of the Apes, opening nationwide Friday, is expected to be a summer blockbuster. So what’s the fascination with apes taking over? Why not Planet of the Dogs or Planet of the Seagulls? “The lure of the Planet of the Apes movies lies in our fascination with the possibility that we are not the only sentient beings on earth,” says University of Notre Dame anthropologist Agustin Fuentes, who specializes in human evolution and primatology.

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Psychologist Darcia Narvaez Comments on Video Game Ruling and Moral Development

Author: Liquid error: internal

Monday’s Supreme Court ruling on the sale of violent video games to minors may have been a victory for free speech, but raises an important issue: Do violent video games really harm kids? Absolutely, according to Darcia Narvaez, a University of Notre Dame psychology professor who researches the effect of violent video games on the developing brains of children and teens.

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Ricardo Ramirez Joins Political Science Faculty

Author: Mark Shuman

Ricardo Ramirez is joining the University of Notre Dame faculty as an associate professor of political science and a fellow at the Francis and Kathleen Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy. A noted scholar of state and local politics, political behavior, and the politics of race and ethnicity, Ramirez is especially interested in how these issues related to participation, mobilization, and political incorporation.

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Psychologist Darcia Narvaez Researches Child Development and Violence

Author: Liquid error: internal

Though isolated acts of violence rarely can be attributed to a single cause, there is one trait common to many perpetrators, according to University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Darcia Narvaez: as children, often they were neglected or exposed to traumatic violence, both of which raise the risk for the development of schizophrenia or other psychotic symptoms later in life.

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Psychologist Darcia Narvaez Studies Violent Video Games' Impact on Kids

Author: Liquid error: internal

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this week from some 12 states, urging it to uphold a law that bans the sale of violent video games to children younger than 18. The states, including California and Texas, say that banning sales to minors would provide moral and psychological protection. University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Darcia Narvaez agrees.

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Psychologist Darcia Narvaez Studies Parenting Practices

Author: Liquid error: internal

Ever meet a kindergartener who seemed naturally compassionate and cared about others’ feelings? Who was cooperative and didn’t demand his own way? Chances are, his parents held, carried, and cuddled him a lot; he most likely was breastfed; he probably routinely slept with his parents; and he likely was encouraged to play outdoors with other children, according to new research findings Notre Dame Psychology Professor Darcia F. Narvaez.

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Institute for Latino Studies to research immigrant retirement savings

Author: Andrew Deliyannides

Karen Richman 2010

The Center for Migration and Border Studies in the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies has received a $125,000 grant from the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE) to investigate how social and cultural factors impact Mexican immigrants’ savings for retirement.

Titled “Understanding and Increasing Mexican Immigrants’ Financial and Retirement Security,” the study will examine how Mexican immigrants prepare, or do not prepare, for retirement. The research applies a novel, interdisciplinary approach to the study of retirement, combining anthropological and economic theories and methods.

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Three Notre Dame faculty members examine Latino life and faith

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Rev. Virgilio Elizondo, Timothy Matovina and Rev. Daniel G. Groody, C.S.C.

“Latino” is not an ethnic label. According to census officials it designates “a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin regardless of race.”

But whatever their multiple ethnicities, Latino people have been present in America longer than any other people aside from Native Americans. They number some 50 million in the United States today, and it is reliably estimated that their population will be doubled by the middle of this century.

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